Feb 26 2014

YOU, YOUR PETS AND PARASITES:

YOU, YOUR PETS AND PARASITES:
HOW MUCH DO YOU KNOW?

pets-and-parasites

Parasites can transmit pathogens that cause health threats to pets and family.  To prevent your pet from becoming a medical statistic, understanding parasitic control is critical to his/her overall health as well as your own.

Most pet owners think of fleas, ticks and mosquitoes as pests that present a threat only during summer and fall, but they are a year round reality that must be kept under control even in cold weather months.  We all love those      unusual warm days that pop up in December or a mid/late winter thaw—we always have one!  Water and one “warm” day are all it takes to bring the mosquito life cycle alive again. In addition, while we keep toasty indoors all winter, parasites are also comfortable living in carpeting and other fiber materials within our homes.

The Culprits and what you need to know:
There are two primary concerns about parasites, for pets and humans: (1) Zoonotic Disease and
(2) Vector-Borne Disease.
Zoonotic Disease is transmitted directly or indirectly from animals to humans, for example roundworms from a dog’s feces can affect the human eye and brain, potentially causing serious infection.

Vector-Borne Disease is transmitted by fleas, ticks, mosquitoes or other parasites that infest dogs and cats. Vector-Borne Diseases can also affect humans, for example, Lyme disease.  In particular in North America, ticks are responsible for transmitting Ehrlichiosis, Lyme disease, relapsing fever, Rocky Mountain spotted fever and tularemia.  New England is an endemic area with a high occurrence of parasitic related illnesses.

-It only takes one mosquito bite to infect an unprotected dog or cat with heartworms.
-Approximately 300,000 dogs in the United States contract heartworms each year.
-The treatment for heartworm disease in dogs can cost thousands of dollars; there is no cure for feline heartworm disease.

The cost of prevention for both species is pennies per day and a worthwhile investment in your pet’s health.
-By the time you see one flea, there could be an infestation of eggs and larvae (maggot like creatures) living in your home bedding, furniture, carpeting and floors.
-Hookworms, an intestinal parasite transmitted by dogs to humans, can cause illness to both.
-Ticks are infecting more dogs and humans with Lyme disease than ever before:  every part of the United States now has ticks thriving within its borders.
-Fleas can cause flea allergy dermatitis and secondary infections from excessive scratching;  anemia and tapeworm infections.
-Roundworms are the most common intestinal parasite in pets and the one most likely to be transmitted to humans.  15% of commercial potting soil contains roundworm eggs

Battle Plan: Parasite Protection and Prevention!
Let’s review the risks if you aren’t providing parasitic protection year round because now you know that parasites can survive during the cold weather months..  They live in protective climates that may exist under the house, in garages or in rodent burrows. Ticks carry and transmit a range of serious diseases to both animals and humans, while fleas can, and often do, cause serious allergic skin reactions. According to the Companion Animal Parasite Council, fleas can cause anemia in small and young animals by feeding on your pet’s blood and they transmit the organism that causes cat scratch disease.  In many cases, treatment is available but costly; in some cases the medical condition is serious enough to be fatal.

Regular, monthly administration of parasitic control costs pennies per day by comparison and offer THE best protection for your family and you. Your veterinarian can guide you on the options best suited to your pet’s life style from injections that protect for six months at a time for heartworm, to oral medication that you provide to your pet each month.  The return on investment is good health!

One last tip: if you need a reminder to remember to administer your parasite prevention each month, just let us know and we’ll give you reminder options!

 

Did You Know?  The Truth About Heartworm Disease

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Learn the deadly facts about Heartworm Disease. 
A disease that is 100%
preventable, yet often fatal.

 

 

 

 

Heartworm Disease Video

Eye-opening statistics: Be Aware of the Facts of the Frequency of

 Parasite and Tick Borne Diseases in the United States

 

Here are some interesting parasite facts form the Companion Animal Parasite Council (CAPC).  This data is provided to the CAPC from Idexx Laboratories and Antech Diagnostics based on the number tested during 2013.  How does the state that you live in compare to the national numbers?

Heartworm:Untitled-1_thumb.png
Dogs:

  • Countrywide 1 out of every 83 dogs tested positive
  • Connecticut 1 out of every 153 dogs tested positive
  • New Hampshire 1 out of every 168 dogs tested positive
  • Maine 1 out of every 77 dogs tested positive
  • Massachusetts 1 out of every 183 dogs tested positive
  • Rhode Island 1 out of every 124 dogs tested positive
  • Vermont 1 out of every 124 dogs tested positive

LymeUntitled-2_thumb.png

  • Countrywide 1 out of every 16 dogs tested positive
  • Connecticut 1 out of every 7 dogs tested positive
  • New Hampshire 1 out of every 7 dogs tested positive
  • Maine 1 out of every 6 dogs tested positive
  • Massachusetts 1 out of every 6 dogs tested positive
  • Rhode Island 1 out of every 6 dogs tested positive
  • Vermont 1 out of every 6 dogs tested positive

EhrlichiosisUntitled-3_thumb.png

  • Countrywide 1 out of every 34 dogs tested positive
  • Connecticut 1 out of every 78 dogs tested positive
  • New Hampshire 1 out of every 68 dogs tested positive
  • Maine 1 out of every 82 dogs tested positive
  • Massachusetts 1 out of every 64 dogs tested positive
  • Rhode Island 1 out of every 106 dogs tested positive
  • Vermont 1 out of every 73 dogs tested positive

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  • Countrywide 1 out of every 31 dogs tested positive
  • Connecticut 1 out of every 6 dogs tested positive
  • New Hampshire 1 out of every 13 dogs tested positive
  • Maine 1 out of every 13 dogs tested positive
  • Massachusetts 1 out of every 9 dogs tested positive
  • Rhode Island 1 out of every 9 dogs tested positive
  • Vermont 1 out of every 28 dogs tested positive
RoundwormDogs:

  • Countrywide1 out of every 57 dogs tested positive
  • Connecticut 1 out of every 59 dogs tested positive
  • New Hampshire 1 out of every 73 dogs tested positive
  • Maine 1 out of every 49 dogs tested positive
  • Massachusetts 1 out of every 63 dogs tested positive
  • Rhode Island 1 out of every 52 dogs tested positive
  • Vermont 1 out of every 59 dogs tested positive
 

 

Hookworm

Dogs:

  • Countrywide1 out of every 43 dogs tested positive
  • Connecticut 1 out of every 55 dogs tested positive
  • New Hampshire 1 out of every 68 dogs tested positive
Cats:

  • Countrywide1 out of every 21 cats tested positive
  • Connecticut 1 out of every 17 cats tested positive
  • New Hampshire 1 out of every 28 cats tested positive
  • Maine 1 out of every 19 cats tested positive
  • Massachusetts 1 out of every 25 cats tested positive
  • Rhode Island 1 out of every 17 cats  tested positive
  • Vermont 1 out of every 28 cats tested positive

Whipworm

Dogs:

  • Countrywide1 out of every 116 dogs tested positive
  • Connecticut 1 out of every 101 dogs tested positive
  • New Hampshire 1 out of every 146 dogs tested positive
  • Maine 1 out of every 130 dogs tested positive
  • Massachusetts 1 out of every 138 dogs tested positive
  • Maine 1 out of every 54 dogs tested positive
  • Massachusetts 1 out of every 68 dogs tested positive
  • Rhode Island 1 out of every 54 dogs tested positive
  • Vermont 1 out of every 54 dogs tested positive

Cats:

  • Countrywide 1 out of every 137 cats tested positive
  • Connecticut 1 out of every 292 cats tested positive
  • New Hampshire 1 out of every 614 cats tested      positive
  • Maine 1 out of every 231 cats tested positive
  • Massachusetts 1 out of every 423 cats tested positive
  • Rhode Island 1 out of every 269 cats  tested positive
  • Vermont 1 out of every 334 cats tested positive

 

Your Guide to Understanding Canine Parasitic Diseases

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